One year of blogging

Hey guys!

 

So my resolution to blog more regularly is still a work in progress, but hey! That’s OK. I’ve crossed the one-year mark in my blogging adventure, and it’s been interesting. I just wanted to write up a little bit about the things I’ve learned and ways in which I’d like to improve my experience as a blogger and a crafter. I knew this year was going to be a wild one since I’ve been settling my new house with my fiance and planning our wedding (and the surprisingly bizarre sense of stress that comes with that). It’s so hard to believe that we’re already at the end of July, I mean seriously, what the heck??

Things I’ve learned (and am still learning):
1. Try not to compare your journey to others’
2. Photography
3. Social Media

1. Try not to compare your journey to others’

I’ve learned a lot since I first started this site and, while it’s already been a year, there’s a severe learning curve! I’d initially started out because I’d seen lots of other really cool crafters running their blogs and they were so gung ho that if you’re passionate, you should just do it! So I thought, “Why yes, I *can* run a blog!” and that was basically what had me going. I love to make things and I love trying my hand at probing my creativity.

But they don’t tell you about the dry spells.

What if nothing really strikes your fancy creativity-wise for a week, or a month? Well, people have to work past that. It’s definitely a skill that I myself need to develop. I’d fallen into a loss-of-crojo-hole for a longer period of time than I would really like to admit. Partly from focusing on other things going on in my life (house, wedding, work, life in general), and partly from falling into a weird brand of FOMO or jealousy. You see other more successful bloggers, creators, crafters, humans, simply doing better. It’s tricky to feel amazing about your work when you see others getting hundreds of instagram likes within an hour, or they work with the newest lines of yarn because they’re sponsored by a major company. It’s easy to fall into that jealousy.

Really easy.

But at the end of the day, you can really only do you.  It’s your blog, your ideas, your spark. If people don’t see it for a while, that’s ok. You’re allowed to feel down occasionally but you have to get up and walk it out eventually. Write the things that feel good for you and share your ideas, put your passion out there. I knew I had ideas, and I wanted to share them with others because I thought it would be fun and I needed the creative outlet. If you’re reading this blog and found it at all helpful, then it wasn’t in vain.

2. Photography

I’ve learned a lot about how to take photos better and have found different things that work for me. I don’t use a DSLR. I’m going to admit right now that I am pretty lazy, but also believe that with the advent of the new technological era that we live in, our cellphones are simply amazing little pieces of tech that can take photos far better than we ever would’ve imagined! If you’re old enough to remember mirror pictures in the days of Myspace, then you know what I’m talking about. (And if you don’t, I’ll quickly explain that you could only use flash indoors and if your mirror wasn’t clean for your selfie attempt, everyone knew.)

I personally love taking photos of my items in daylight, but it was a trial and error sort of thing. When I first started making items and attempted to take pictures of them, it was always in the evening or nighttime and the lighting inside the house was simply not right, never captured the color of the hat or scarf I was working on properly, and it was just very hard to try and sell the idea of the item that I had made. But I was always enthused to take a picture of something when I had the time, which was usually nighttime because, well, I had to go to my not-internet job. So I adjusted to taking pictures of things on my day off, making the most of my time and daylight.

I’d love to be the kind of person who just “wakes up earlier” before work and “gets things done”…but I’m lying to myself. I will sleep as much as I can possibly get away with before starting to get ready for work. It’s just who I am and I haven’t adjusted yet. Room for improvement, perhaps.

But UNTIL THAT TIME, I tend to take pictures on my days off. Natural light works wonderfully, and I think it makes my photos more genuine and true to the colors of my work, rather than trying to adjust the lighting on an Instagram filter later on. Less work for me! Play with what works. Sometimes I like morning light, sometimes late afternoon. They both lend a beautiful quality to the photos.

Where I need to improve: adding more textures to my photos. I tend to put my items on a neutral-color base and snap a picture. Sometimes with one of my hands on it, or not, depending on what I’m feeling. I’ve loved seeing how others do a textural palette of items to create a well-curated feeling of home. I like it, and I’d like to incorporate more of that into my work. But that also helps tie into my next topic:

3. Social Media

Man, social MEDIA. It’s such a cool and useful tool and yet can be so incredibly frustrating and time-consuming at times. Am I right? Social media helps to give me such good ideas or helpful tips and yet also breeds the feelings of jealousy and FOMO and everything else. However, in terms of getting bloggy information out there, there really is no other way to do it. I like sharing my ideas and my items on Instagram and I really love seeing the beautiful and interesting things that other people are creating. It was so incredibly helpful when I was just starting out on Etsy and the inspiration that you can find is amazing. But it can be overwhelming at times. I’m still working on regularly posting, both on my Facebook page as well as my Instagram (though with my loss of crafting desire those have been weaker lately), but haven’t really figured out how to harness the power of Pinterest. Lots of other successful bloggers swear by it, but I haven’t figured it out yet. It’s super helpful for wedding planning ideas, but for driving business to this blog of mine, not so much.

That being said, though, my most popular post on this blog, HANDS-DOWN by hundreds of views, is my Crochet Animal Headbands post. Literally. It got picked up by some other pinners on Pinterest and took off like a shot. Even now, a year later, still getting hits on it, and I sometimes feel like I will never surpass it! So you never know what will be popular or what others will like. It’s the internet, I don’t know. Like I mentioned before, you do you. Make what you like, post your pictures, and let them be free. Your social media presence is all your own. No one else can tell you what to do or how to do it, everyone has their own voice and sense of style no matter the media. Instagram, Facebook, their website, it doesn’t matter: there are many ways to do you. Like all neutrals? Go! Only like amigurumi? Go! Do you only like working with one color? Go! Find what works for your voice. Not everyone will like it, but who cares. You’ll find your tribe, trust me. I’ve seen people who do the things I’ve just mentioned, so there is a precedent!

Be flexible. Social media is a weird shape-shifter and lots of weird things will pop up and algorithms will change, but:
– determine how much time you actually want to dedicate to social media (how many platforms?)
– stick to the things that you feel comfortable with doing. (eg: don’t do a live video if you’re not into that)
– stay true to your desires and goals, and everyone’s is different

 

——

I hope that this has been helpful for anyone else, but it feels good to recap a little of my experience in the past year with trying to run this blog. I certainly have a lot more to learn, like using MailChimp to send things out if I get subscribers, and working more on what I’d like my aesthetic to be. I like to come at my social media with optimism, but I also enjoy poking fun at myself and hope my humor carries across in my internet-life. I shall see where I am in another year, but I’m sure I’ll let you know! Blogging and social media, and the whole shebang can be very tricky at times, but you can get so much out of it. It just depends on what you’re looking for, and that is an ever-changing thing. And that’s ok, too.

 

Until next time,
Gilliane

 

If you’d like to join in on my social media activities, I’d love to see you around! You can find me on my GillyGnits Facebook page and my Instagram! Let’s connect 🙂

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Capri Cactus

 

 

Hey there!

 

Today, I wanted to share with you a brief review of a new yarn I ran across in Michael’s PLUS a short and sweet pattern for an adorable cactus! Everyone has their go-to yarns, and I’m no less susceptible to this. Sometimes, when you work with the same yarn, you run the chance of getting into a craft rut, and nobody likes that.

And it’s so easy to do sometimes. You get used to buying particular brands of yarn or, if you’re like me, you craft things for different seasonal craft fairs and create a bunch of similar-looking items and get into your go-to patterns. It’s for this reason that I usually get trapped into the mindset that I can only do fairs in the fall and winter because in my state, most people aren’t going to want a hat or a scarf in May, it’s just not going to happen. I don’t usually even bother looking into spring and summer fairs–I received an email from a place I regularly do a Christmastime fair with asking if I’d like to join their Spring fair and had to decline the offer.

I simply don’t have enough items in stock to justify doing a springtime craft fair. And I wondered why that was, that I struggled with making items in a big enough quantity to do my work year-round. I have dozens of hats and scarves (some of which you’ll find here on the blog!) and I make them year-round saving them for fall and wintertime. And in my case, I realized that part of my problem was that I was in a yarn rut, not expanding my fiber horizons to make something new! I was walking into Michaels pretty regularly, but walking out without having purchased any yarn at all, I just “wasn’t feeling it”.

 

I was in a rut.

 

And then one day, I walked into Michaels and stopped by an end-cap in the yarn section of the store and saw these adorable small balls of yarn:

 

Produced by Loops & Threads, these cute little balls finally caught my attention. I’d passed by them in the past, disregarding them and assuming they were just smaller cuts of other varieties of the brand. Curiosity getting the better of me, I squished one of them.

And it was such a splendid feeling!

I got confused because they weren’t just another acrylic yarn like I had initially assumed, so I checked out the composition on the label to find out that this delightful blend was:

 

57% Cotton
28% Nylon
15% Polyester

 

I was also surprised to find that, unlike lots of other yarn labels, this one had a RANGE for hooks that could be used with the product, like so:

 

The reason for the range is that the material composition creates a springy quality to the fiber, so you can make it tighter or looser, obviously, but the elasticity gives it a wide range that makes it equally applicable across the hook sizes that it suggests.

 

It caught my interest and wound up in my cart! I knew I couldn’t make a hat or a scarf with it, unless I bought quite a few balls of it (since it’s 87 yards/ball), so I wanted to be more outside of the box and come up with a new type of item I could set aside and keep in mind for (next) spring and summer! Well, how about a cactus? Very simple, and the color seemed perfect! You can make several of these if you’re getting ready for a craft fair, need quick gifts for the office, or maybe even wedding favors?

 

“Gilliane, stop, give me the rundown of the pattern”
Okay!

 

Materials:

Ball of Capri Yarn by Loops & Threads
(I used Kelly Green)
G 4.0 mm Hook
Tapestry needle
Scissors
Small clay pot
Small amount of polyester fiberfill

 

Terms Used (US):

ch = chain
sc = single crochet

 

Instructions:

[Note: Leave a length of yarn before your starting chain for sewing in later]

Chain 13
Row 1: Sc into 2nd ch from hook, sc across, ch 1, turn (12 sc)
Row 2-18: sc into back loop of each stitch across, ch 1, turn (12 sc)
Row 19: sc into back loops of each stitch across

Fold over your rectangle, and slip stitch your working loop through the loops of both your starting chain and your last worked row. You have the option of slip stitching across the length of your tube, or single crochet! Bind off, leaving a length of yarn for sewing.

You have a small green tube, now what? Thread your needle with one of the lengths of yarn on your tube (no matter which one) and cinch one end of the piece closed. Turn your tube inside out, so that your seam will disappear into what will be your cactus. This will also take care of the length you used for cinching it closed, because it will be tucked away into the body of the cactus! You’ll then stuff it with some polyester fiberfill to give it body–the amount you want to tuck into it is up to you, but if you overstuff it, then the fill is going to peek out from your stitches. So find a happy medium 🙂

Once you’ve got it properly stuffed to your liking, thread your last remaining yarn end with your tapestry needle and cinch the last of your tube closed. Another way is to run your stitch around the opening and *then* stuff it, so whichever way you feel is the right way on this.

Cinch it closed, run a few more stitches over the cinched/puckered part, slip stitch it off and thread your remaining tail into the body of the cactus. I like to run the needle through the whole thing and pull it out through the other side, then cut the excess so that the tail will be in the middle of the all the fiber fill.

Isn’t it adorable? Stick a needle in it, it’s done! You can use it to decorate your desk, and even use it as a functional pin cushion, the sky’s the limit! I hope you enjoy working this pattern, I had a great time making it, and I think it’s the push I needed to come up with more warm-weather things! Let’s get the crojo flowing!

 

Until next time,
Gilliane

 

Like this pattern? Don’t forget to pin this article on Pinterest!
And I’d love to see your finished projects! Please share with me on Facebook and Instagram!
Finished items made from this pattern may be personally sold on your Etsy and at craft fairs, but please share the love and credit the pattern back here! And please don’t copy and paste this pattern as your own!

 

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The Everybody Hat

 

Hey guys!

 

Welcome back to the blog!

 

Today, I wanted to share with you my latest design, which is super simple because I love simple (doesn’t everybody?) and super chunky. If you’ve been following me for a while now, you know that I’m a Californian and, as a Californian, we love to talk about the weather.

 

Because it’s either beautiful, or hot, or 3 days of rain that leave various areas in pandemonium.

 

I love California.

 

So I think this will have to be the last of my cold-weather items for the next few months? I want to re-focus the energies on looking forward. I’m thinking more summery items and planning ahead for fall holidays. I happen to also be planning my wedding right now (I just started dress shopping the other day!!!), so the more I can do ahead of time, the better it will honestly be for me in the long run! Heyyy. I thought I would break out this little gem of a hat which might be helpful for those of you in actually cold parts of the world: The Everybody Hat.

Why is it called The Everybody Hat? Because everybody can wear it and it’s simple enough that everybody can make it. The construction of the body of the hat is so incredibly simple and the sizing is very straightforward, a beautifully unisex hat. Without further ado, let’s go!

 

Materials:

Bernat Softee Chunky Yarn (5)
– I used Emerald
P hook
Tapestry needle
Scissors

Terms Used (US):

HDC – half double crochet
BLO – back loop only

Instructions:

Ch 23
Row 1: HDC into 3rd chain from the hook and across
Row 2: Ch 1, HDC through both loops of first stitch, HDC into BLO until last stitch, HDC both loops of last stitch
Row 3-desired length: Repeat Row 2. Aim for your work to be about 20 inches, it’ll stretch! You can also use your head as a reference for the circumference!

Once you’ve reached your desired length, chain 1 and fold your piece in half. and single crochet* your 2 halves (starting chain + last working row) together. Leave a long tail and bind off. Then, use your tail and needle to cinch your hat tube!

And of course, weave in your ends. Luckily, there are only 2!

 

You can either wear your hat slouchy, or you can double it over, creating a brim!

 

And that’s the Everybody Hat! I hope you’ve enjoyed this pattern, I’m hoping to get more summer-friendly posts up soon, so stay on the lookout for that! Also, please feel free to subscribe to the blog, you can find the link off to the right hand side of the page!

 

Until next time,
Gilliane

 

Like this pattern? Don’t forget to pin this article on Pinterest!
And I’d love to see your finished projects! Please share with me on Facebook and Instagram!
Finished items made from this pattern may be personally sold on your Etsy and at craft fairs, but please share the love and credit the pattern back here! And please don’t copy and paste this pattern as your own!

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Morning Mist Triangle Scarf

Hey, lookie here!
I’m on a roll lately!

I’ve been wanting to share this project with y’all for a little while now and I think that this is as good of a time as any! I was strolling along in Michael’s looking at the yarn and trying to feel inspired. I wanted something that was cozy, maybe with some natural fibers in it, but also more in the scarf realm of accessories. I’ve been in love lately with the Virus shawl stitching (I think I am going to make a million of them and store them back for Christmas and birthday presents for people, maybe even throw them up on the Etsy shop), but I wanted to go with some nice basics before I venture into creating patterns of my own with more complex mathematics behind it.

And so I found it. A ball of this super cozy Touch of Alpaca yarn from Lion Brand! I haven’t really worked with an Alpaca yarn before, so I was quite excited for finding a good project for it! I also didn’t want to waste too much time, simply because here in sunny SoCal there is a definite time stamp for warm clothing and accessories and it is usually very brief. I feel for those of you in much colder climates with longer bouts of weather, but here in California they come fast and don’t stay long, which makes it a bit tricky for knitters and crocheters. Venturing into the thick of April, we’re pretty much going to be in summer mode really soon.

(It’s also because of this lack of watery seasons that we have drought issues and fire seasons that last a lot longer than they used to, but hey)

 

 

So here’s a project for the tail end of winter weather but can still be used for the chilly days and evenings ahead as Spring wakes up! I’m calling it the Morning Mist Triangle Scarf because it’s such a lovely gray color and the wispiness of the Alpaca yarn really spoke to me. I hope you enjoy!

Materials:
1 Ball of Lion Brand Yarns Touch of Alpaca
(I used the color Oxford Grey)
I hook (5.5mm)
Scissors
Tapestry needle

 

Terms Used (US)
DC = double crochet
ch = chain
trbl = treble crochet
sl st = slip stitch

 

 

 

Instructions:

Starting with a Magic Circle
Row 1: Insert your hook into the middle of the Circle, pulling up the working yarn, and Chain 4. 2 DC into the Circle, ch 1, 3 DC into the Circle

Row 2: Ch 4 and turn, 3 DC into the top of the previous DC, ch 1, [3DC, ch 1, 3DC] into the ch 1 space, ch 1, 3 DC into the 4th chain of the previous row

Rows 3: Ch 4 and turn, 3 DC into the top of the previous DC, ch 1, 3 DC into ch 1 space, ch 1, [3DC, ch 1, 3DC] into the ch 1 space, ch 1, 3 DC into ch 1 space, ch 1, 3 DC into the 4th chain of the previous row

At this point, you’ll see that the combo I’ve labeled “[3DC, ch 1, 3DC] into the ch 1 space” is your center point. From here you’ll build out your triangle, doing 3 DC into every ch 1 and 4th chain of your previous row at the end EXCEPT for the center point where you’ll do the combo.

Do this until you’ve reached 29 rows!

For the scallop edging:

Usually with scallop edging, you have to count more specifically with how many individual stitches until you begin the next scallop, but I think that it is a much easier process with the granny triangle that we’ve got here, since you’re working with the large gaps created by the chain 1 spaces between the granny clusters.

Ch 3, 2 trbl crochet into the first ch 1 gap, sl st into the next ch 1 space, 5 trbl into the next, sl st into the next, and continue until you reach the center ch 1 space
In the center ch 1 space, 3 trbl, ch 1, 3 trbl and sl st into the next ch 1 space.

 

I really enjoy the simplicity of this scarf even though it might look a bit more complex. The deceptiveness of it is A+! You can whip this scarf up in absolutely no time at all and be ready for a coffee date, like so:

 

Thank goodness for those fun Snapchat filters, am I right? If you’re digging that sleeve in the picture, it’s my Irish Flag Coffee Sleeve, since I’m a sucker for coffee cozies you know! Alright, time for me to go grab coffee and get back to the yarn. Hope you all have a great rest of your weekend!

 

Until then,
Gilliane

 

 

Like this pattern? Don’t forget to pin this article on Pinterest!
And I’d love to see your finished projects! Please share with me on Facebook and Instagram!
Finished items made from this pattern may be personally sold on your Etsy and at craft fairs, but please share the love and credit the pattern back here! And please don’t copy and paste this pattern as your own!

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Bunny Butt Coffee Sleeve

 

 

Hey friends!

 

I have been absolutely awful about getting fresh posts up on the blog. The internet hasn’t been working with me, but that’s okay! Where there’s a will there’s a way, right? And this is my second post today! Check my other one over here! So I’m back to share this adorable quick little project with you: the Bunny Butt Coffee Sleeve!

 

Isn’t he cute? I know that Easter is literally right around the corner, but this is going to be perfect for the springtime drinks that are coming your way, I just know it. Everyone has been doing the iconic bunny face + ears combo which is so classic and lovely, but I wanted to flip it on its head with this project.

 

Bunny booty!

Literally.

And make it a bunny booty instead. I think that it adds this really delightful 3D aspect to the sleeve which gives it that dash of personality. So cheers and bottoms up for this newest coffee sleeve!

 

 

Materials:

Bernat Softee Chunky yarn in Gray Heather
Loops and Threads Charisma yarn in White
K hook 6.5 mm
Clover pom pom maker
Scissors
Tapestry needle

Terms Used (US)
sc = single crochet
sl st = slip stitch
ch = chain

 

 

Instructions

Sleeve Body:

With your Gray yarn and K hook, chain 23 and slip stitch to form a circle, taking care not to twist the chain
Round 1: Ch 1, sc into slip stitch and each chain around, slip stitch into your original ch 1
Rounds 2-7: Repeat Round 1. When completed with your final round, sl st off and weave in those ends!

Bunny Tail:

Craft your bunny tail using the pom pom maker instructions with the White yarn. You can also definitely create the pom pom by hand if that’s your preference! I used the Clover pom pom maker, specifically the green one from this set here. Take your pom and attach it into the middle of your Sleeve, tie it securely and trim off the ends!

Bottoms up!

Have a great weekend, everyone! And a happy (or hoppy) Easter if you celebrate!

 

 

Until then,
Gilliane

 

Like this pattern? Don’t forget to pin this article on Pinterest!
And I’d love to see your finished projects! Please share with me on Facebook and Instagram!
Finished items made from this pattern may be personally sold on your Etsy and at craft fairs, but please share the love and credit the pattern back here! And please don’t copy and paste this pattern as your own!

 

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Brain Slug Inspired Headband

Hey there, guys and gals!

 

This post today comes from a project that I had completed over the summer which I really enjoyed. San Diego Comic Con was coming up and I wanted to come up with a variety of pieces to wear for each day, just for fun. I really enjoyed seeing other yarny crafters’ ideas, showing off their skills and love of pop culture. You can check out my recap with this post! One of the projects that I myself had put together was a headband that looked like one of the brain slugs from Futurama. I wanted something simple that I could put together for the event that wouldn’t be too obtrusive and I think that this one fit the bill.

It’s a nice quick project and I think you’ll enjoy it. With the convention season off to a strong start (WonderCon, in Anaheim, CA, was just this past weekend!), perhaps you’ll be looking for something simple but also nerdy and funny. So enjoy and let me know how it turned out for you!

 

Materials:

4.5 Crochet Hook
Worsted weight yarn in a green color
(I used Big Twist Premium in Sprout)
White felt
Green felt
Permanent marker
Hot glue gun (I’m sure crazy glue would work as well)
Headband (find a similar set here)
A small amount of poly fiber fill for stuffing

 

Terms Used (US):

sc = single crochet
st/sts = stitch/stitches
trbl = treble crochet
sl st = slip stitch
ch = chain

 

Your slug is going to be done in a couple of pieces that will be assembled together. The pieces will consist of the Body, the Base, and the Antennae. We’ll start with the Body since it’s your largest piece of the puzzle.

 

 

Body:
With your yarn, start with a magic circle

Round 1: Ch 1, 12 sc into magic circle. sl st into beginning ch 1
Round 2: Ch 1, 2 sc into each stitch around, sl st to beginning ch 1
Round 3 – 13: Ch 1, sc into each stitch around, sl st to beginning ch 1
Bind off

 

Base:
Start with another magic circle
Round 1: Ch 1, 12 sc into the magic circle and sl st to the beginning ch 1
Round 2: Ch 1, 2 sc into each stitch around and sl st to the beginning ch 1
Round 3: Ch 1, sc into each stitch around and sl st to the beginning ch 1
Do not bind off

 

You can begin attaching the Base to the Body with a sl st to connect the pieces. Ch 1, sc into the sl st, and single crochet matching the scs from each piece, creating the seam between the two pieces. Work half of your seam, and then start stuffing your Slug. It’s harder to stuff the body and THEN try to seam your pieces together, so at least get them lined up and halfway stitched together, and then start stuffing! Like so:

 

 

 

Once you’ve stuffed your Slug and feel good about its fullness, then continue to finish the single crochet seam and sl st to the beginning ch 1. Don’t bind off

This will cause a small pucker to form at your base and will give you the launch pad for the little tentacles, which we will be working in scallops.

Scallops:
Ch 1, skip 1 stitch, 5 trebel crochet into the next stitch, sl st the next, sk st, 5 trbl, and continue to the end of the round, sl st and bind off.

These will form your little undulating “legs” for the Slug!

 

Now let’s put some antennae on this guy!

 

Antennae:

(You’re going to make 2 of these)

Leave a small beginning tail and ch 7, then 3 sc into the 2nd chain from the hook
Sc back around to the beginning chain
Bind off with a bit of a tail and stitch it into the top of your Slug, wherever you’d prefer. Tie your ends into a nice knot and tuck your ends into the Body of the Slug!

 

 

He’s looking more alive now, but now he needs an eye!

 

 

Remember in the materials list when I said you need felt? The time has come! I’ll give you an approximation of how big the rounds of felt should be, but I literally just used some appropriate lids to trace circles for them. You’ll need one circle of white felt and another circle of the green felt.

Let your glue gun heat up while you’re tracing and cutting out your felt if you’re using one. I felt a glue gun would be the most effective option, but you can go with the type of adhesive you feel the most comfortable with or have laying around the house.

The white felt circle will need a dot in the middle of it, which you can draw in with the permanent marker. This is going to be the eye of the Slug. The green one will be going underneath the Slug and help you keep it on the headband.

Glue your white felt onto the middle of the body of your Slug where you’d like the eye!
Take your Slug and place it on the top part of your headband where you’d like it to go. In the show Futurama, which directly inspired this project, they’re situated off to the side of the person’s head, as you can see in this image:

 

 

And that’s what I went with with my headband, though you are free to place it where you’d like. Once you’ve picked where you want it to go, lather up some glue on the bottom of your slug and some on your green felt and sandwich your headband between the 2 pieces. It’s slightly chunky for the headband on its own and the felt on the bottom gives it extra stability. (I’ve suggested green since it would more readily blend in with the green of the Slug itself, though you could just use another piece of the white felt and make sure it didn’t tuck out too far of your Slug body.

 

Once the glue has cooled down and/or dried, you’re good to go! You’re ready to join the Brain Slug Party! I hope you like working with this pattern and I’d love to see your work, so feel free to tag me on the Internet!

 

Side fun:
Here’s a shot of me at San Diego Comic Con in 2017 wearing my Slug while working on some other projects in my downtime.

 

Conventions can get wild and it’s necessary to decompress from the madness! I’ve shared the patterns for the projects in the past here on the blog. I’m holding a pair of Ewok inspired ears, which you can find on my Crochet Animal Headbands post, and on the table is a pair of gloves worked up from my pattern Granny Gone Chic Gloves!

 

 

Until then,
Gilliane

 

 

Like this pattern? Don’t forget to pin this article on Pinterest!
And I’d love to see your finished projects! Please share with me on Facebook and Instagram!
Finished items made from this pattern may be personally sold on your Etsy and at craft fairs, but please share the love and credit the pattern back here! And please don’t copy and paste this pattern as your own!

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Irish Flag Coffee Sleeve

Shout out to IKEA for this awesome impromptu photoshoot setting 😉

 

 

Hey there, friends and happy Monday!

 

I’m back! I have a new pattern and I hope you enjoy it! I’m a fan of St. Patrick’s Day, which is coming up this weekend, and can’t get Irish soda bread off my mind. It’s so delicious–if you haven’t had it, search for it in your local grocery store! They are delicious cold or warm and delightful with butter! But aside from bread, I think it’s a nice little cultural holiday, representative of my own cultural background, and wanted to come up with something fun to celebrate!

 

If you’ve been following the blog for a while, you already know that I am a HUGE fan of coffee sleeves. I think they are so versatile and I love creating new patterns to personalize my favorite cups of hot goodness–tea and coffee and hot cocoa oh my! Might as well have a different sleeve for every occasion, right? So I thought I’d go back to the drawing board and whip something up with some various colors I have in my possession.

 

Because coffee sleeves (or cozies) are so versatile, personalizable, and great stash busters, you don’t have to use the same colors that I did. You just need to know that this pattern is worked in worsted weight yarn and I will tell you what yarns I used in case you also have tidbits of those in your own stash! So let’s get to work!

 

Materials:

5.0 H hook
Tapestry needle
Scissors
Red Heart Super Saver in Pumpkin
Red Heart Super Saver in White
Impeccable in Kelly Green

 

Terms Used (US):

sl st = slip stitch
sc = single crochet
ch = chain
st/sts = stitch/stitches

Instructions:

With hook and Kelly Green, ch 32, and slip stitch to beginning of chain to form a loop, taking care not to twist the chain
Round 1: Ch 1, sc into first chain of base, sc into each stitch around, sl st to beginning ch 1
Rounds 2-3: Ch 1, sc into sl st and all sts around, sl st to beginning chain

Introduce your next color, White, however which way you feel comfortable. I personally feel more comfortable binding off my previous color and then introducing my new color with a slip stitch, though others feel okay with doing their color change as they’re finishing off the last stitch of the previous Round. Go with whatever makes you feel better as a crafter and your confidence level, and start your next round

Round 4: Once your new color is introduced, ch 1, sc into your newly created sl st, sc around and sl st to beginning chain
Rounds 5-6: Ch 1, sc into sl st, sc around to beginning, sl st to beginning chain

 

Now throw in your final color: Pumpkin. Keep your color change consistent, so whatever you did with your previous change, keep it up!

 

Rounds 7-9: Ch 1, sc into sl st, sc around to beginning, sl st to beginning chain.

After the end of Round 9, bind off and weave in all of your ends

 

Your new coffee sleeve is ready to party!

 

 

Hope you guys have a great St. Patrick’s Day! I’ll catch you all soon 🙂

 

Until then,

Gilliane

 

 

p.s. If you’re digging this coffee sleeve pattern, then I’d like to point you over to some of my other sleeve patterns in what is turning out to be its own series! Check out the Hygge, Santa Belly, Frankie, and Top of the Class coffee sleeve patterns and get yourself some sleeves for every occasion!

 

Like this pattern? Don’t forget to pin this article for later on Pinterest!
And I’d love to see your finished projects! Please share with me on Facebook and Instagram!
Finished items made from this pattern may be personally sold on your Etsy and at craft fairs, but please share the love and credit the pattern back here! And please don’t copy and paste this pattern as your own!

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Resolutions

Hey everyone!

 

Happy New Year!

(It’s not too late to say that, is it??)

Welcome back to the blog, it’s a new year and a new post about my thoughts on the upcoming year, crafting and otherwise. What are your resolutions? It’s okay if you’ve already “broken” them, I’m not judging! You can always get back up on that horse. Haven’t made any yet? That’s ok, too, there’s no rush, you can resolve to do things better whenever you want. That’s kind of the beauty of resolutions, you can do them whenever, they’re just more popular to start at the beginning of a new year. You can start on March 2nd if you want, or August 27th, your resolutions are your own.

I’ve got a wild year already up and running and it isn’t about to slow down anytime soon. 2018 is just going to be a crazy year with getting our new house up and ready and planning our wedding which is set for December–everything is just going to fly fast! But I can’t let go of my favorite things in the melee: yarn. I have to set for myself resolutions to keep in mind and work on them throughout the year, not letting the excuse of other things get in the way of my other goals.

One goal I have is to learn new types of stitches! There is such a wide, vast, variety of stitches that are available to us as crafters and I want to tap into that font more this year. I started toward the end of last year by learning the Arcade Stitch via Wool and the Gang. They shared this helpful tutorial and I went from that to create a scarf. Learning new stitches is a great way to just run through balls and skeins of yarn to complete new and interesting scarves.

 

I have also learned the Linen Stitch. This is a really great and simple stitch, I’ll definitely be using it for other projects. You can find a thorough explanation of the stitch here. One I have in mind is from Rescued Paws Designs, their Jane Blanket is so beautiful.

 

Aside from learning new stitches, I’d like to work at being a better blogger: taking pictures, creating more posts on my reviews of yarn I have liked (or disliked), updates on my goals, creating more patterns to share with you! I also need to figure out how subscriptions work, especially with the little pop-up reminder for those who haven’t subscribed (it’s currently in the right-hand sidebar of the blog). Who knew there were so many technical facets to craft blogging?? I’ve been stressed lately, but that is no excuse for my laziness, so I’ll be endeavoring to do better. 2018 is going to be a great year!

 

What are your goals for the upcoming year? I’d love to hear them! Feel free to share in the comments, as well as via social media. You can find me on Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest, let’s connect!

 

Until then,

Gilliane

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Sienna Scarf Crochet Pattern

 

 

Hey guys!

 

I’ve been a flurry of posts this week, trying to catch up after a long absence on here (over a month?) It’s been a crazy quarter, with trying to work on requests (one I’ve been working on for FAR too long), craft fairs, wedding stuff, a pulled hand muscle (check out this article I wrote on taking care of yourself because I didn’t take my own advice) and the passing of a relative. But just because I haven’t been updating on here doesn’t mean that I haven’t been working on projects. Check out my instagram for the current works in progress!

Today I have for you a new pattern for this super luscious scarf that I whipped up in a short amount of time–perfect for all of the last-minute projects you might want to crank out for Christmas, which is less than 2 days away!

 

I, personally, am not ready. You know how you get things ahead of time and then pat yourself on the back, slow down and lose the momentum you had to finish up present buying/making? Yeah, that’s where I’m at on my Christmas shopping. Whoops. But we’ve all been there…

 

But here’s a scarf to help you out, and it’s from this delightful yarn I found over at Michael’s a few weeks back called Braid Big from Loops and Threads! I worked up a whopping 3 different projects from one ball o

f this magic yarn and if there’s one thing I love, it’s getting mileage from good yardage in my yarn. Yarnage? (We’ll work on it.) But it has 262 yards of super bulky yarn so when you work with large hooks, these projects pretty much complete themselves. Easy peasy. Also, the self-ombre effect in the yarn makes for a lot of versatility in the colorway, which is perfection for a lazy person like myself who detests color changes! Heeeeey

 

So in this post I’ll share this scarf pattern, called the Sienna Scarf.

Materials:

One ball of Braid Big! from Loops and Threads
(I used the colorway Tan)
P hook (11.5mm)
Tapestry needle
Scissors
Piece of cardboard measuring about 6 inches, or however long you want your fringe

 

Terms Used (US):

sc = single crochet
DC = double crochet
ch = chain

Instructions:

With P hook, chain 12
Row 1: DC in 3rd chain from hook, sc next stitch, [DC, sc,]*, repeat * to end of row. Ch 2 and turn.
Row 2: DC in sc from previous row, sc next stitch, [DC, sc]*, repeat from * to end of row. Ch 2 and turn.
Repeat Row 2 until the piece measures your desired length. In my case, I eyeballed it by working until the piece measured where each end touched a hip when worn around my neck.

 

Fringe:

Grab your piece of cardboard. I used a mailer I’d received from Barnes and Noble because I thought that would make a good length for fringe. You can find inspiration anywhere! Wrap 24 times around your piece of cardboard and cut at one side. You’re going to need 24 lengths of yarn. Take 3 strips at a time and place them evenly on each end of your scarf. Voila!

Doesn’t that look dreamy? Look at all of that squish! I hope you enjoyed this latest post and hope to see you soon! Good luck with all of your holiday crafting, may the odds be ever in your favor! If you want some other quick projects, check out my patterns for the Hygge Coffee Sleeve and Crochet Animal Headbands!

 

Until then,
Gilliane

 

Like this pattern? Don’t forget to pin this article for later on Pinterest!
And I’d love to see your finished projects! Please share with me on Facebook and Instagram!
Finished items made from this pattern may be personally sold on your Etsy and at craft fairs, but please share the love and credit the pattern back here! And please don’t copy and paste this pattern as your own!

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Quick Squish Scarves

Hey everyone!

 

Christmas is coming too fast! Doesn’t it feel that way? I thought I had more time, but I guess that’s true of most things. I did a couple of craft fairs this season and the question I was asked most frequently was “Do you have long scarves?” My answer, surprising and unfortunate, was no. I have a love of the circular neck warmers and really didn’t have anything in the way of simple long scarves. You learn something new at each fair!

So I set out to change that and whip up a couple of scarves to change up my stock and run through extra balls of yarn I had that I had decided against the projects I originally planned. If you’re panicked for time and want to make some scarves for the people in your life, this is the perfect option. I worked these two scarves in Loops and Threads Charisma, using 2 balls worked together for extra volume and warmth.

They’re very simple and are fast, super fast, to work up, so if you want that plush goodness–I got you, boo.

 

Materials:

2 balls Loops and Threads Charisma
(I used 2 balls of Taupe and 1 of both Red and Charcoal, respectively)

Q hook

Tapestry needle

Scissors

 

Directions:

Working two strands as one, chain 10

Row 1: HDC in 3rd chain from hook, HDC across (8)

Row 2: ch 2, turn. HDC across (8)

Continue repeating Row 2 until you’ve reached your desired length. I kept going until I was close to the end of the yardage for super long scarves.

[If you want a thinner or wider scarf, just make sure to chain an even number and HDC in the 3rd chain 😉]

I did my last row in single crochet, which you just chain 1 and single crochet across.

Bind off and weave in the ends, now you’re ready to throw a ribbon around it or toss it around your neck!

I hope you enjoyed this pattern and, while it’s perfect for your last-minute crafting, it will also be perfect as a nice basic scarf for you to enjoy throughout the year and in a variety of colors. Happy crafting and best of luck with getting everything done!

 

Until next time,

Gilliane

 

Like this pattern? Don’t forget to pin this article for later on Pinterest!
And I’d love to see your finished projects! Please share with me on Facebook and Instagram!
Finished items made from this pattern may be personally sold on your Etsy and at craft fairs, but please share the love and credit the pattern back here! And please don’t copy and paste this pattern as your own!

Continue Reading