Top of the Class Pencil Scarf

Hey there! I know that it’s the dead of summer right now and all you want to do is run and hop and skip and jump and have lazy days…but school is coming again. That’s right, school. is. coming. again.


Byeeeeee, random kid from the internet in this stock picture!


Before you know it, it’s going to be time to do the Back to School shopping and get new backpacks and clothes and all of the fun (and not-so-fun like waking up early) stuff that comes along with it! And judging by the ads and displays at Target and Walmart, for some of you it’s already time! Time to sharpen those pencils and get back to school!

This pattern that I’m sharing with you today would make a perfect scarf for a student (even for your college kid heading off or back to campus!) or a splendid gift for that teacher in your life, ooooor even a great quirky perk to your own outfit! I wanted something kind of whimsical looking as a fun project to work on and I was inspired by my Project Scrap Yarn that I have been working through. (Click through for my post about PSY! You can also look for the hashtag on my Instagram!) My favorite aspect of the pattern is the crinkle look of the faux-metal tip of the pencil, I think it gives it a super cute textural aspect to the design! If the crinkle look isn’t personally your thing, I’ll include the alternative faux-metal tip, there is a lot of flexibility in crochet. You can follow the pattern to the letter or, if you would like a thinner/tighter scarf, feel free to use a smaller hook to obtain that kind of gauge. You can make it however long you would like! Whether you like the ascot-ty look or you really want the scarf to wrap around, the design is pretty straightforward and versatile, I hope you enjoy it!


**Notes** Because a lot of this pattern is small color changes, I’ve highlighted the colors being used in BOLD to help it stand out in the text, so you don’t accidentally skip it somehow.

The yarn color you’ll need the most of for this project is the gold/yellow, since everything else is in small quantities.


Seriously. The black yarn you’ll only need for like 8 stitches and room for weaving in the ends. Really small.



*1 Ball of worsted weight yarn (4) in Yellow
[I used Red Heart Super Saver in Gold]
*Small parts of:
Black (for the lead)
[I used Red Heart Super Saver]
Beige (for the pencil)
[I used Impeccable in Heather]
Gray (for the ‘metal’ tip)
[I used Craft Smart yarn in Gray]
Pink (for the eraser)
[I used Impeccable in Arbor Rose]
*I Hook
*Tapestry needle

Terms Used:
SC=Single Crochet
DC=Double Crochet



With Black, ch 2
Row 1: 2 sc into the second chain from the hook, ch 1, turn
Row 2: 1 sc into each stitch, ch 1, turn (2 sc)
Row 3: 2 sc into each st, yarn over and slip knot to end the color. Color change to Beige. Ch 1 with Beige and turn. (4)

I didn’t like my original attempt at color changing, which is why I’m suggesting just binding off each color and then slipping in the new color!

I had originally tried a color change in the last stitch, but it didn’t really work out the way that I had liked, so I felt it was necessary to complete each other in the row before introducing the new color in each block. It looked really messy on one side which, for some projects, is okay, but this kind of annoyed me, so here’s the two examples of the pencil tips that I made:


The wonky one was okay on the other side, just flip it over:

So it’s up to you whether you want to make the color change in the last stitch in your row, but this is what I liked the best for this project in particular…and the one I went with!


Row 4: 2 sc into first st, sc next 2 sts, 2 sc last st. Ch 1 and turn (6)
Row 5: 2 sc into first st, sc next 4 sts, 2 sc last st. Ch 1 and turn (8)
Row 6: 2 sc into first st, sc next 6 sts, 2 sc last st, yarn over and slip knot to end the color. Color change to Yellow. Ch 1 with Yellow and turn (10)
Row 7: 2 sc into first st, sc next 8 sts, 2 sc last st. Ch 1 and turn (12)
Row 8: Sc each st across, ch 1, turn (12)
Row 9-??: Sc each st across, ch 1, and turn until the body of the scarf has reached a comfortable length for your project’s needs!

You might want a scarf that’s more ascot length or a super scarf, or you might want something shorter for your kindergartner but something longer for your college kid, so I’ve left the length more or less up to you! If you have a whole skein of the yellow yarn, then you have lots of room to play with the length, it’s your scarf!

But there’s still more! Leave room for the eraser!

Last row of Yellow: Sc across all stitches, yarn over and slip knot to end the color, color change with Grey. Ch 1 with Grey and turn
**Grey 1: Single crochet into each stitch across, ch 2 and turn

Grey 2-8: 1 DC into the first stitch, sc the second, DC the 3rd, continue pattern to the end, ch 2 and turn.



The above chart is meant to help you out in the scheme of how the stitches are supposed to situate themselves, the 3 with a bracket off to the right hand side of the chart is to denote a stitch height of 3! I hope this helps! (Please let me know if it doesn’t make sense, or if I can clarify it. My Microsoft Paint skills are pretty good, I hope!)


**Alternative with Grey**
If the crinkle effect isn’t to your liking, you can DC into each stitch across the row, ch 2 and turn. Repeat for each row until the eraser metal is to your desired length, but 10 rows would make an appropriate length.



At end of final row, color change with Pink. Ch 1 with Pink and turn

Pink Row 1: Sc into each st across, ch 1 and turn.

Pink Row 2-8: Repeat Pink Row 1 until the Eraser is your favorite length!
Note: You can make the Grey and Pink rows as long as you’d like, though however many rows you use, match it in the opposite color to make the sections even

Bind off and weave in all ends. Wear it like a scholarly rock star!




Like this pattern? Don’t forget to pin this article on Pinterest!
And I’d love to see your finished projects! Please share with me on Facebook and Instagram!
Finished items made from this pattern may be personally sold on your Etsy and at craft fairs, but please share the love and credit the pattern back here! And please don’t copy and paste this pattern as your own!



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